Zero waste Christmas wrapping ideas

lead image

Be kind you Mother Earth this Christmas

Have you adopted the zero waste lifestyle recently and now you're wondering how to go about wrapping Christmas presents? Here are wrapping paper alternatives to help you stay on track and have a zero waste Christmas.

Zero waste Christmas: Wrapping paper alternatives

Drawstring eco bags

We try to stay away from using paper as much as possible since we are trying to do Mother Earth a favour, but you can reuse paper bags if you have plenty of that lying around. A better option is to use drawstring eco bags instead because they are durable, reusable and washable. Plus we can guarantee you that they are stronger than paper and would hold heavy gifts really well.

Fabric

zero waste

Sewing scraps, old shirts, cloth napkins or scarves make great wrapping paper alternatives. If you worry about it being too shabby to wrap a Christmas present then opt for a furoshiki. Not only is it zero waste and totally eco-friendly, but it also teaches you a style of wrapping that is both unique and interesting.

Baskets

Drawing inspirations from hampers and baby gifts, a basket is extremely versatile not to mention sturdy. You can place some old fabric scraps at the bottom of the basket if you need to build more volume. They will also provide padding for your Christmas gifts especially if they are homemade and packed in jars. Dress up the handles with some ribbon, then add some natural accents to the basket and you would have an impressive zero waste gift this Christmas,

Mason jars

zero waste

Jars are a great idea zero waste alternative if you're giving out homemade Christmas gifts. Chocolate truffles, ginger cookies, cookie mix, spiced jams would all look super inviting in a jar. Minimal decorations are needed because the content of jar is the real star. Old fabric, burlap, ribbons and twine is sufficient and the biggest plus point is that your recipient will be able to reuse the jar.

Old pillowcases

Who would've thought? All you need to do is sew the top and put a string through and you would have your very own DIY drawstring bag! You can even make several drawstring bags out of one pillowcase by easily cutting them down to size. This is such a brilliant zero waste wrapping idea because I'm sure all of us have old pillowcases lying around.

Zero waste Christmas: Tying and adornments

Twine/hemp

There's really no use for tape especially if you're going to be using fabric and cloth bags to wrap your presents. So twine or hemp will be your best bet when it comes to tying everything up. But even if you are using recycled newspaper and paper bags, you can still use twine to tie everything up.

Leather Cord

You can purchase this easily at craft stores, and use it to tie up your gifts. It is a nice change from using twine or hemp strings because sometimes the leather cords are coloured which will really pop against anything that's plain.

Fabric scraps

Fabric scraps are so useful because the pattern and colour choices are endless. Even smaller strips can replace ribbons or twine while odd size square ones can dress up a plain looking jar. DIY rosettes, or use them as fillers, fabric scraps are a great solution for zero waste.

Old jewellery

Old jewellery or beads works wonders as well for tying and adding some bling to your gifts. Incorporate them with the fabric scraps or use them on its own, the options are limitless. Just apply a bit of creativity and with little effort and you'll have beautiful personalised gifts to give out.

Cinnamon sticks

Bring your gifts to a whole other level by adding cinnamon sticks as part of the deco. Not only is it festive, but they also smell great and are compostable. Tie them on with some rosemary using twine or fabric strips. You never know, both of them might end up in pots the very next day and the receiver has you to thank for.

Nature

Fallen branches, pinecones, winter berries or twigs all make great additions. Simply secure them on with twine while making sure that they do not drop out just before boxing day. All of them are compostable, and best of all they're free!

Having a zero waste lifestyle might be challenging but with practice and the determination to push through, it will slowly come more naturally and one day you'll be wondering what was all the fuss about in the beginning.